Madeleine Dean Cunnane (born June 6, 1959) is an American lawyer and politician serving as the U.S. representative[1] for Pennsylvania’s 4th congressional district.[2] The district includes almost all of Montgomery County, a suburban county north of Philadelphia. Before being elected to Congress, Dean was a Democratic member of the Pennsylvania General Assembly, representing the 153rd district[3][4] in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives.

Early life and education

The youngest of seven children, Madeleine Dean was born to Bob and Mary Dean in Glenside, Pennsylvania. She graduated from Abington Senior High School.[4] She graduated magna cum laude from La Salle University, and earned her Juris Doctor at the Widener University Delaware Law School. She also studied politics and public service at the Fels Institute of Government of the University of Pennsylvania.[5]

Career

After law school, Dean returned to the Philadelphia area and practiced law with the Philadelphia Trial Lawyers, going on to serve as executive director. She then opened a small, three-woman law practice in Glenside, and served as in-house counsel for her husband’s growing bicycle business.[6]

While raising three young sons, Dean turned to teaching. She served 10 years as an assistant professor of English at her alma mater, La Salle University, in Philadelphia, where she taught writing and ethics.[6][7]

Early political career

Dean got her start in politics soon after graduating from high school, when she was elected to an Abington Township committee seat.[8]

She volunteered on her first campaign, for Joe Hoeffel‘s reelection to the state legislature, in the same district seat she later held. On that campaign she met her future husband, Patrick Cunnane, then a 19-year-old elected committee-person.[when?]

Pennsylvania House of Representatives

Having worked and volunteered in politics for decades, and her children grown, Dean was asked to become a public servant herself, serving as Abington Township commissioner, and ran for state representative in 2012.[9] In the State House, she prioritized social issues such as addiction, equal rights, access to healthcare, ethics, criminal justice reform, and gun violence.[citation needed]

After the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, Dean and Dan Frankel co-founded the gun violence prevention caucus, PA SAFE Caucus. The caucus is a self-described coalition of legislators and advocates dedicated to curbing the sale of illegal guns.[10]

In 2015, Dean was appointed to the Governor’s Commission for Women,[11] a commission designed to advise the governor on policies and legislation that promote equality issues ranging from sexual assault to business initiatives.[11] In 2017, she was elected chair of the Southeast Delegation of the Pennsylvania House Democrats, composed of 22 House Democrats representing nine counties.[12]

She served on several committees, including Appropriations, Judiciary, Policy, Urban Affairs, State Government, and Finance, of which she was vice-chair.[4]

Dean stated in 2014: “We know that the number one issue with voters is education and how we fund our public schools”. Regarding the Pennsylvania education budget for 2013, the then-state Representative said: “How we educate our kids tells us how our economy will be.” In that same instance, she highlighted the issue of public school funding.[13]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2018

In February 2018, after a significant change in Pennsylvania’s congressional districts mandated by the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, Dean announced she would end her campaign for lieutenant governor and instead run for Congress in the 4th district.[14] The district had previously been the 13th, represented by two-term fellow Democrat Brendan Boyle. But the 13th’s share of Philadelphia, including Boyle’s home, was drawn into the 2nd district, and Boyle opted to run for reelection there.[citation needed]

On May 15, Dean defeated two challengers, Shira Goodman and former Congressman Joe Hoeffel, in the Democratic primary.[15] In the general election she defeated Republican Dan David with 63.45% of the vote to his 36.55%.[16] She was one of four Democratic women elected to Congress from Pennsylvania in 2018. The others were Mary Gay Scanlon, Chrissy Houlahan and Susan Wild. The state’s delegation had previously been all male.

2020

Dean ran for reelection and defeated the Republican nominee, military veteran and political commentator Kathy Barnette,[17] with 59.5% of the vote to Barnette’s 40.5%.[18]

Tenure

On January 12, 2021, Dean was named a manager for the second impeachment of Donald Trump.[19]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Electoral history

Pennsylvania House of Representatives, 2012 special election
153rd legislative district
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Madeleine Dean 5,206 56.49
RepublicanNicholas Mattiacci4,00943.51
Total votes9,215 100.00
Democratic hold
Pennsylvania House of Representatives 2012 election
153rd legislative district
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Madeleine Dean (incumbent) 20,934 64.17
RepublicanNicholas Mattiacci11,36934.85
LibertarianKenneth Krawchuk3200.98
Total votes32,623 100.00
Democratic hold
Pennsylvania House of Representatives 2014 election
153rd legislative district
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Madeleine Dean (incumbent) Unopposed
Total votes16,984 100.00
Democratic hold
Pennsylvania House of Representatives 2016 election
153rd legislative district
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Madeleine Dean (incumbent) 24,496 66.25
RepublicanAnthony Scalfaro III12,47833.75
Total votes36,974 100.00
Democratic hold
Pennsylvania’s 4th congressional district, 2018
Democratic primary results
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Madeleine Dean 42,625 72.6
DemocraticShira Goodman9,64516.4
DemocraticJoe Hoeffel6,43111.0
Total votes58,701 100.0
Pennsylvania’s 4th congressional district, 2018
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Madeleine Dean 211,524 63.5
RepublicanDan David121,46736.5
Total votes332,991 100.0
Democratic hold
Pennsylvania’s 4th congressional district, 2020[22]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Madeleine Dean (incumbent) 264,637 59.5
RepublicanKathy Barnette179,92640.5
Total votes444,563 100.0
Democratic hold

Other political campaigns

Lieutenant governor

In November 2017, Dean announced her candidacy for lieutenant governor of Pennsylvania, facing, among others, incumbent Mike Stack in the Democratic primary.[23] She dropped out to run for Congress.

Personal life

Dean lives in Abington Township (with a Jenkintown address), with her husband, Patrick “P.J.” Cunnane. Cunnane is an entrepreneur in the bicycle industry and managed Advanced Sports International. They have three grown sons and three grandchildren. Her son, Pat, was senior writer and deputy director of messaging in the Obama administration.[24]

See also

References

  1. ^ “Pennsylvania Election Results: Fourth House District”. The New York Times. Archived from the original on November 6, 2018. Retrieved November 7, 2018.
  2. ^ “Suburban Philly lawmaker drops lieutenant governor bid to run for Congress”. Penn Live. Archived from the original on February 22, 2018. Retrieved February 22, 2018.
  3. ^ “Representative Madeleine Dean’s Biography”. Project Vote Smart. Archived from the original on May 26, 2013. Retrieved November 22, 2012.
  4. ^ a b c “Madeleine Dean”. Pennsylvania House of Representatives. Archived from the original on November 11, 2012. Retrieved November 22, 2012.
  5. ^ “About Congresswoman Madeleine Dean”. U.S. House of Representatives. February 15, 2021. Archived from the original on February 15, 2021. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  6. ^ a b “Meet Madeleine”. Reelect Madeline Dean. February 15, 2021. Archived from the original on February 15, 2021. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  7. ^ Waller, Allyson (January 26, 2021). “Here Are the House Managers in Trump’s Second Impeachment Trial”. The New York Times. Archived from the original on February 15, 2021. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  8. ^ Roebuck, Jeremy; Tamari, Jonathan (February 9, 2021). “Montco’s Bruce Castor and Madeleine Dean bring very different approaches to Trump’s impeachment trial”. The Philadelphia Inquirer. Archived from the original on February 12, 2021. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  9. ^ Freeman, Jarreau (November 6, 2012). “ELECTION 2012: Madeleine Dean defeats Nick Mattiacci, Ken Krawchuk for the 153rd seat”. Times Chronicle. Archived from the original on April 4, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2018.
  10. ^ “Lawmakers, gun-safety advocates announce formation of PA SAFE”. PA SAFE Caucus. March 15, 2016. Archived from the original on January 18, 2018. Retrieved January 18, 2018.
  11. ^ a b “Wolf Names 26 to the Pennsylvania Commission for Women”. Governor Tom Wolf. October 7, 2015. Archived from the original on January 18, 2018. Retrieved January 18, 2018.
  12. ^ “House Democrats’ Southeast Delegation leadership team elected”. Southeast Delegation. January 4, 2017. Archived from the original on January 18, 2018. Retrieved January 18, 2018.
  13. ^ Pennington, Maura. “PA lawmakers put education at top of agenda in election year”. Watchdog. Archived from the original on May 19, 2022. Retrieved February 23, 2018.
  14. ^ Micek, John L. (February 22, 2018). “Suburban Philly lawmaker drops lieutenant governor bid to run for Congress”. The Patriot-News. Archived from the original on June 14, 2018. Retrieved November 12, 2018.
  15. ^ “Pennsylvania Primary Election Results”. The New York Times. May 17, 2018. Archived from the original on September 15, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2018.
  16. ^ “2018 General Election: Representative in Congress”. Pennsylvania Department of State. November 6, 2016. Archived from the original on September 11, 2020. Retrieved November 12, 2018.
  17. ^ Shuey, Karen (February 26, 2020). “Conservative commentator seeks 4th Congressional District seat”. Reading Eagle. Archived from the original on October 13, 2020. Retrieved February 21, 2021.
  18. ^ “2020 Presidential Election – Representative in Congress”. Pennsylvania Department of State. Archived from the original on March 4, 2021. Retrieved February 21, 2021.
  19. ^ “Pelosi Names Impeachment Managers”. Speaker Nancy Pelosi. January 12, 2021. Archived from the original on February 11, 2021. Retrieved January 13, 2021.
  20. ^ “Caucus Members”. Congressional Progressive Caucus. Archived from the original on January 14, 2021. Retrieved March 29, 2021.
  21. ^ “Members”. New Democrat Coalition. Archived from the original on February 8, 2018. Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  22. ^ “2020 Presidential Election – Representative in Congress”. Pennsylvania Department of State. Archived from the original on March 4, 2021. Retrieved January 25, 2021.
  23. ^ Navratil, Liz (November 29, 2017). “State Rep. Madeleine Dean to run for lieutenant governor”. Philadelphia Inquirer. Archived from the original on November 11, 2018. Retrieved November 11, 2018.
  24. ^ Kurtz, Judy (April 18, 2018). “Former Obama staffer dishes on White House life in ‘West Winging It’. The Hill. Archived from the original on January 6, 2019. Retrieved January 5, 2019.

External links

Pennsylvania House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives
from the 153rd district

2012–2018
Succeeded by

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania’s 4th congressional district

2019–present
Incumbent
Preceded by

Chair of the Congressional Women’s Caucus
2021–present
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
302nd
Succeeded by